Research: Effectiveness of Educational Technology on K-12 Education

researchBelow is a selection of research relevant to the field of educational technology organized by Dr. Christopher Shamburg, Professor and Coordinator of the Doctoral Program in Educational Technology Leadership at New Jersey City University. New Jersey City University is a partner of NJECC.

Please feel free to contact Dr. Shamburg at cshamburg@njcu.edu if you have any questions regarding this list or would like to suggest research to be included in this list.

Bers, M. U. (2012). Designing digital experiences for positive youth development: From playpen to playground. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Buechley, L., Peppler, K., Eisenberg, M., & Yasmin, K. (2013). Textile Messages: Dispatches from the world of e-textiles and education.  New York, NY: Peter Lang.

Cheung, A., Slavin, R.E. (2012, April). The effectiveness of educational technology applications for enhancing reading achievement in K-12 classrooms: A Meta-Analysis. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University, Center for Research and Reform in Education.  Available at http://www.bestevidence.org/reading/tech/tech_K_12_read.html

Greene, J. A., Sandoval, W. A., & Bråten, I. (Eds.). (2016). Handbook of epistemic cognition. New York, NY: Routledge.

Lankshear, C, Knobel, M. (2011).  New literacies: Everyday practice and social learning. 3rd Edition.  New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Malouf, D. B., & Taymans, J. M. (2016). Anatomy of an evidence base. Educational Researcher45(8), 454-459. Availale at. http://journals.sagepub.com/stoken/rbtfl/0R2B1/vQXN8xI/full

O’Neil, C. (2016). Weapons of math destruction: How big data increases inequality and threatens democracy.  New York, NY: Crown.

Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (2015). PISA 2015 Results (Volume 1). Available at  http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/education/pisa-2015-results-volume-i_9789264266490-en

Picciano, A. G., Dziuban, C. D., & Graham, C. R. (2013). Blended learning: Research perspectives (Vol. 2). New York, NY: Routledge.

Reiser, R.A. (2012). What field did you say you were in?: Defining and naming our field. In R.A. Reiser & J.V. Dempsey (Eds.), Trends and issues in instructional design and technology (3rd ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson Education. Available at http://www-fp.pearsonhighered.com/assets/hip/us/hip_us_pearsonhighered/samplechapter/0132563584.pdf 

Salen, K., & Zimmerman, E. (2004). Rules of play: Game design fundamentals. MIT press. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Salen, K., Torres, R., Wolozin, L, Rufo-Tepper, R, Shapiro (2011). Quest to learn: Developing the school for digital kids. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.  Available at https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/quest-learn 

US. Department of Education (n.d.) What works clearinghouse.  Available at https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/

Zhang, L., Khan, G., & Tahirsylaj, A. (2015). Student performance, school differentiation, and world cultures: Evidence from PISA 2009. International Journal of Educational Development42, 43-53.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1a7J2E2QYf1KOhL-RdQxcJLKsOjb3dafd-L4bXR40SDc/pub?embedded=true